That’s Entertainment!

Dance, theater, sports, the circus, and more recently film are all popular pastimes and for many a welcome escape from the rigors of the workplace and the demands of daily life. There is a long relationship of the visual arts with leisure (indeed, the visual arts are commonly thought of as another leisure activity). This exhibition presents a range of objects by artists made from the late 18th century until the late 20th century that portray a diverse array of leisure pursuits and the people famously involved with them.

From Cornelius Dusart’s Le Fete de Village (Village Fair), 1685 to Harriet Whitney Frishmuth’s The Dancers, 1921, to Carol Wax’s Photo Reelism, 1999 artists have treated the theme in novel and idiosyncratic ways. For example, Seong Moy saw the circus as an opportunity to expand on his theory of abstraction while Swietlan Nicholas Kraczyna used two costumed dancers to explore and further master color etching. Additionally, there is often an emotional element coloring the viewer’s perception. William Gropper’s Composition for Race, circa 1935 instills an energy that adds excitement to the scene where Wooden Horses, 1936 by Reginald Marsh offers a disquieting vision of a popular carnival ride. Coupled with candid pictures of 20th century celebrities like Lucille Ball, Groucho Marx and Bob Hope, That’s Entertainment offers a different view of a field that has become one of the world’s major industries.


EXHIBITION CONTENTS:
-45 objects including prints,  photographs, drawings, paintings and sculpture
-Text panel and group object labels
-Exhibition brochure
EXHIBITION FEE: $6500.00

WANDERLUST: Travel Photography from the Syracuse University Art Collection

Defined by the Photographic Society of America as an image that expresses the characteristic features or culture of a land as they are found naturally, with no geographic limitations, the genre of travel photography has intrigued artists since the dawn of photography in the 1830s.  This exhibition of thirty original photographs explores how a variety of artists from the late 1800s until today have captured landscapes, either near or far, in order to give viewers a glimpse of diverse and varied places.


EXHIBITION CONTENTS:

30 photographs
Text panel and object labels
Illustrated brochure

Installation Space: 150 linear feet

EXHIBITION FEE: $4000.00

 

About Prints: The Legacy of Stanley William Hayter and the Atelier 17

In 1962 S. W. Hayter published his second major text on the graphic arts that he intended for “the intelligent layman” who might collect or have an interest in the contemporary printmaking.  About Prints was reviewed extensively by art critics, historians and other printmakers and generally acclaimed “a standard work both for the potential collector and anyone interested in modern art.” Hayter was the founder of Atelier 17 and by the early 1960s considered one of the most influential printmakers of the 20th century in large part because of the environment he created in his Parisian and New York print studios.  Working with some of the most important artists of the day, Hayter championed experimentation and the development of new printing techniques while understanding that any form of printmaking is merely a tool for the expression of an artistic idea.

The exhibition, About Prints: The Legacy of Stanley William Hayter and Atelier 17, explores Hayter’s ideas about contemporary printmaking and the artists who created these works.  Using Hayter’s own checklist of important prints the exhibition looks at why these images are innovative or essential to understanding how the graphic arts were being transformed throughout the 20th century.  Works by recognizable artists such as Picasso, Marc Chagall, and Henry Moore are examined along with other important visionaries such as Andre Masson, Max Ernst and Joan Miro.  Technical innovators like Karl Schrag, Arthur Deshaies, and Krishna Reddy are also represented in the exhibition along with Helen Phillips, Mauricio Lasansky and S. W. Hayter.


Number of objects:
Installation Space:  350 linear feet
(25) copies of the fully illustrated catalog, (500) exhibition brochures, graphic panels about print media and the Atelier 17, and extended didactic label copy are included in the rental of the exhibition.

EXHIBITION FEE: $7500.00

ILLUSTRATED CHECKLIST

POLITICS ON PAPER: Art with an Agenda from the SUArt Collection

This exhibition examines the long established parallels between the printed image and social commentary. Included are drawings, cartoons and illustrations from important and cartoonists such as Thomas Nast, Paul Szep, Alan Dunn and Barry Blitt; as well as  prints and photographs by Francisco de Goya, Käthe Kollwitz, Barbara Morgan, and Robert Rauschenberg. The works on paper selected reflect a variety of social motives including politics, war, race inequality, and gender issues.


Number of objects: 50
Installation Space: 250 linear feet
Brochure Available

EXHIBITION FEE: $4500.00

ILLUSTRATED CHECKLIST

HARD EARNED: The Military Photographs of Stacy Pearsall and the Veteran’s Portrait Project

Stacy L. Pearsall got her start as an Air Force photographer at the age of 17. During her time in the service, she traveled to over 41 countries and attended the Military Photojournalism Program in the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University. Pearsall earned the Bronze Star and Air Force Commendation with Valor,  is one of only two women to win the National Press Photographer’s Association Military Photographer of the Year competition, and the only woman to have won it twice. This exhibition highlights Pearsall’s combat photography as well as selections from her award winning series, the Veteran’s Portrait Project.


Number of objects: 45
Installation Space: 250 linear feet
Brochure Available

EXHIBITION FEE: $4500.00

ILLUSTRATED CHECKLIST

ANNOTATED CHECKLIST

Quiet Intersections: The Graphic Work of Robert Kipniss

The language of abstraction exists within the universe of images.  –Robert Kipniss

Robert Kipniss’ pictorial style had largely matured by the time he made his first print in 1967. He had effectively transitioned from painting realistic landscapes, such as the rocky escarpments of the northern end of New York’s Central Park, to pictures that remained recognizable yet were composed of unrelated, sometimes imaginary, elements. The evolution was propelled by the artist’s growing conviction that his representational imagery didn’t have to reproduce visual reality. He learned that painting what you see could include what was seen by the mind’s eye.

His move into printmaking was initially spurred by commercial considerations but over a relatively short time frame Kipniss developed an aesthetic interest and facility for the medium. His prints examine subjects similar to his paintings but offer different insights, often reflecting the print medium’s particular visual and technical characteristics of line and tone. Consequently Kipniss became more and more recognized as a printmaker and gained a new cadre of collectors who were particularly interested in his graphic output. This exhibition features 35 examples of Kipniss’s graphic work spanning a time period of over 45 years of working with a variety of printmaking processes.


Number of objects: 35
Installation Space: 175 linear feet
Brochure  and Catalog Available

EXHIBITION FEE: $3500.00

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Everyday Art: Street Photography in the Syracuse University Art Collection

The art of capturing fleeting moments and sharing new perspectives to reveal everyday interactions has an extensive history in photography.  Ranging in time periods, geographic location and content, this exhibition of 35 photographs presents a group of well-known artists, each of whom took their camera to the streets in order to capture visions of everyday scenes the majority of people may not be able, or choose, to see.  Examining the work of, but not limited to, Eugene Atget’s turn of the century images of Paris, angled views of California in the 1970s by master photographer Garry Winogrand, and contemporary New York City views captured by Donna Ferrato, the images presented in this exhibition visualize the evolution of Street Photography as an artistic style.


Number of objects: 35
Installation space: 175 linear feet
Brochure Available

EXHIBITION FEE: $3500.00

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Rotimi Fani-Kayode (1955-1989)

Rotimi Fani-Kayode (1955-1989) is a solo retrospective of the work of this seminal and highly influential figure in 1980s black British and African contemporary art. Although his career was cut short by his untimely death at the age of 34, Fani-Kayode nonetheless remains one of the most significant names in the history of black photography.  This exhibition was organized by Light Work, in partnership with Autograph ABP.

Curated in collaboration with Mark Sealy and Renée Mussai of Autograph ABP, whose co-founder and first Chair was Rotimi Fani-Kayode, the exhibition features a selection of his most important photographic works produced between 1985-1989, including large-scale color works and arresting black and white images. Fani-Kayode’s photographic portraits explore complex personal and politically-engaged notions of desire, spirituality, and cultural dislocation. They depict the black male body as a focal point both to interpret and probe the boundaries of spiritual and erotic fantasy, and of cultural and sexual difference. Ancestral rituals and a provocative, multi-layered symbolism fuse with archetypal motifs from European and African cultures and subcultures, inspired by what Yoruba priests call “the technique of ecstasy.” Hence Fani-Kayode uses the medium of photography not only to question issues of sexuality and homoerotic desire, but also to address themes of diaspora and belonging, and the tensions between his homosexuality and his Yoruba upbringing. This exhibition coincides with the introduction of new punitive legislation in Nigeria, Fani-Kayode’s country of birth, as well as other countries in Africa in recent years outlawing same-sex marriages and membership of gay rights organizations. Continue Reading

Emilio Sanchez: No Way Home, Images of the Caribbean and New York City

Emilio Sanchez’ life was filled with complexity; both personally and professionally. Born into one of Cuba’s oldest and wealthiest families, he had a conflicted sense of home caused by an early life of continual travel.   Eventually, he went to New York City in 1944 to take art classes at Columbia and by 1952 decided to relocate there.  Early images portrayed the landscape surrounding his father’s plantation in Cuba and described cane fields dotted with palm trees or working class residences and villages.  Apparent in them is an interest in pattern, color and strong lighting contrasts that came to characterize his mature style.  New York provided different and endless opportunities to explore compositional light and pattern combinations that were inspired by earlier artists like Charles Sheeler, Georgia O’Keefe and Edward Hopper. Twenty-five objects including paintings, watercolors, drawings and prints describe the work of this Cuban American artist.


Number of objects: 24
Installation Space: 200 linear feet
Brochure Available

EXHIBITION FEE: $4250.00

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The New Humanists: Introspective Impressions from the Syracuse University Art Collection

The New Humanists examines the swell of post-World War II visual artists making work rooted in the psychological state of humanity: through introspection, observation and reflection. Heavily influenced by German Expressionism, Surrealism, and the Social Realism of the 1930s, these artists sought to elicit the viewer with an emotional response- to question how we see ourselves and the world around us.  Included in the exhibition is the work of Leonard Baskin, Robert Marx, Mauricio Lasansky, Nancy Grossman, Jacob Landau, Don Cortese, Jack Levine, Fredrico Castellón and José Luis Cuevas.


Number of objects: 30
Installation Space: 175 linear feet
Brochure Available

EXHIBITION FEE: $3500.00

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST